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INTRODUCTION:

I am excited about starting my seventh year here at Londonderry!  Here is a little of my background, I was born and raised in Delaware. I received my Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Pennsylvania where I taught Social Studies for eight years. In the past I taught Multicultural History, Psychology, Early American History, Current Issues, Economics, U.S History, Sophomore Humanities and Civics.  This year I will be teaching AP Government & Politics, United States History and Sophomore Humanities. 

 Please feel free to reach me at 432-6941, ext. 2862 or e-mail me at vprough@londonderry.org.

For 1st Semester, I will have a student intern, William Moher, join me for my U.S. History classes.  

CLASS SCHEDULE:

1st Semester & 2nd Semester

Click on your class period for more details on the course.

B Period- Advanced Placement: U.S. Government and Politics

C & F Pds- United States History 

G & H Pds- Sophomore Humanities  

 

 

 

AP Government and Politics: Room 163

This Advanced Placement course is a College-level course.  As such it requires a great deal of student participation both inside and outside of the classroom.  Interest level is key to a student’s success in an AP Government course.  Outside the classroom you are expected to complete all reading assignments and stay current with today’s news.  Not every reading assignment will be discussed in class; however, you can expect to be tested on them.   

 

You will be expected to keep note cards for vocabulary and the note cards will be collected for each unit on test day.  These cards will be graded for an assignment and ultimately helpful in studying for tests, exams and the AP test.  It will also be helpful to keep a notebook with a section specifically for all materials related to readings (i.e. your notes, study guides and handouts)

 

While students aren’t required to take the AP exam, this course is designed to prepare students for the test in May. At the end of each unit students will be required to take a test. Tests will be created to mirror the AP Exam with multiple choice sections and free-response questions. To prepare students for the timed element of the test every test in class will be timed.  Quizzes will often be used to see if students are doing their outside reading.

 

Staying current with today’s news is essential.  Finding a radio, TV or internet source and connecting to it each day will help you with class discussions and help you to make connections between what we are learning in class and how the government works.  Students will be tested on current events. 

 

 

 

Click on Documents at the top of the page to see the entire Syllabus that includes reading assignments for every unit.

 

AP Government will be divided into 9 units of study during the year.  Listed below are the course units, essential unit questions, and some of the topics we will be examining together.   

 I. POLITICAL LANDSCAPES 

II. US CONSTITUTION & FEDERALISM

III. CONGRESS

IV. THE PRESIDENCY & THE FEDERAL BUREAUCRACY

V. THE JUDICIARY & SELECT SUPREME COURT DECISIONS

VI. CIVIL RIGHTS & CIVIL LIBERTIES

 VII. CAMPAIGNS, ELECTIONS & POLITICAL PARTIES

VIII. THE MEDIA, POLLING & INTEREST GROUPS

 IX. PUBLIC POLICY 

 

Grading Criteria

 Grading is based on total points earned as a percentage of total possible points. Points are earned through a variety of assessments, including classwork, homework, discussion, readings, projects, quizzes, tests and free response questions.
 

Semester Grading Criteria

Each quarter grade is worth 40% of the final average, with the semester exam accounting for the remaining 20%. Successful completion of each semester earns ½ credit toward the graduation requirement

 

Attendance Policy 

Attendance in class is an essential part of the learning process. When students are absent, there is an academic consequence. During any given quarter, a student may accrue up to five absences from the class before he/she will earn an administrative failure for that quarter. Three tardies will equal one absence; being more than 20 minutes late to class will be considered equal to one absence. Further details and conditions of the LHS attendance policy can be found on pp. 23-24 of the Student Handbook.

 

Make up work/Late Work Policy 

Assignments should be completed on the due date to receive full credit. Homework late by one day receives half-credit; no credit is given for work turned in later. Long-term project grades are reduced by 10% (one letter grade) for each day late. Make-up work is the student’s responsibility and must be completed within 5 school days of the student’s return to school. Students should see the teacher to arrange a make-up place/time.

 

Academic Integrity Policy (Cheating and Plagiarism)

See “Plagiarism, Cheating, Improper Use of Technology” on p. 40 of the Student Handbook. Penalties for plagiarism and/or cheating  may include zero credit, reduced credit, and/or mandatory revision of the work in question. 

 

Class Supplies

Text - O'Conner, Karen & Sabato, Larry. American Government : Continuity & Change. 2002 edition. New York: Longman. ISBN: 0-321-08674-0 

 

Supplemental Reader - Serow, Ann & Ladd, Everett. The Lanahan

Readings in the American Polity. 4th edition. Baltimore: Lanahan, 2007.

ISBN: 1-930398-09-3.  

                  

Summer Reading: 

 The summer readings change from year to year. This summer, the books include 1) Presidential Courage by Michael Beschloss and 2)  Hardball by Chris Matthews. Students will be tested on what they learned from their summer readings within the 1st week of school.  The grade received on this test will count as an exam grade.

 

COMPETENCIES: 

COMPETENCY ONE:

Students will be able to apply their knowledge of government and politics by answering a Free-Response Question modeled after the AP Exam questions.  Free-Response questions are questions that require analytical and organizational skills.  These are timed questions that generally require 25 minutes on average to complete.

COMPETENCY TWO

Students will analyze an assigned political cartoon.

COMPETENCY THREE

Students will be able to read and analyze the information provided in charts and graphs in order to better understand our political institution and its impact on society.

COMPETENCY FOUR

For this AP Government competency you will be assigned a chapter in the Lanahan Reader and then summarize and analyze what you have read.

 

 Grading: 

Tests (40%)- Tests will be modeled after the AP exam.  They will accompany each unit with Unit IV having two tests.  One class period will include a 60 question multiple choice question test that is equal in length and time to the actual AP exam.  The second class period will include 1 or 2 free-response questions.  You are expected to have completed all of your readings.  Questions will come from readings and class discussions.  This means you will be tested on material that was in your reading, but not discussed in class.   

 

Quizzes (10%)- Quizzes will be announced and unannounced throughout this course.  Questions will include material from readings, the textbook, discussions, assignments, and current events.  Remember to stay current with your readings and to stay up to date with current events! 

 

Assignments (30%)- Assignments will count for 20% of your grade and they will include study guides for readings, a variety of writing assignments, in-class projects, cooperative learning projects and simulations.

 

Participation/Discussion(20%)- Discussions will be another form of assessment used in class to determine if you are staying up to date with your reading and current events.  Discussions will also give you practice analyzing the topics that are read and discussed in class.

SEMESTER GRADE:

Quarter 1 (40%)  +   Quarter 2 (40%)  +   Final Exam (20%)  =  Final Grade  100%

UNITED STATES HISTORY

UNITED STATES HISTORY

Room 163

U.S. History 10 is a requisite two-semester survey of American history from 1877 to the present.  Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed.  Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents, and historiography. The class format will stay as varied as possible to illustrate the excitement and value of learning about our past to better guide our future.   

 

GRADING:  Grading is based on total points earned as a percentage of total possible points. Points are earned through a variety of assessments, including classwork, homework, projects, quizzes and tests. Class participation will also be considered as involvement and discussion are a critical component of this class.

 

SEMESTER GRADING CRITERIA:  Each quarter grade is worth 40% of the final average, with the semester exam accounting for the remaining 20%. Successful completion of each semester earns ½ credit toward the graduation requirements.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Attendance is an essential part of the learning process. When students are absent, there are academic consequences. During any given quarter, a student may accrue up to five absences from the class before he/she will earn an administrative failure for that quarter. Three tardies will equal one absence; 20 minutes or more late to class will be considered equal to one absence. Further details and conditions of the LHS attendance policy can be found on pgs. 23-24 of the Student Handbook.

 

LATE WORK/MAKE-UP WORK POLICY: Homework will include various assignments that range from readings of various texts, to assorted worksheets, organizers, research, and studying for quizzes and tests.  If a student is absent, they will receive one week to turn in missing work and/or make-up exams.  Extenuating circumstances will be determined on a case by case basis. It is the student’s responsibility to meet with their teacher to work out details. Long term assignments and projects are due the day a student returns from an absence and “late” loses a letter grade for each day it is late. No “late” work will be collected beyond day 5.

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY: See “Plagiarism, Cheating, Improper Use of Technology” on pg. 40 of the Student Handbook for details. Penalties for plagiarism and/or cheating may include zero or reduced credit, and/or mandatory revision of the work in question. Additional action may be taken by administration pending the circumstances.

 

CLASS SUPPLIES: The course text is McGraw Hill/Glencoe’s The American Republic Since 1877 © 2005. This text book should be covered at all times to secure its condition. In addition to the course text, recommended materials include a notebook, a 3-ring binder for all handouts, an assignment book of sorts, pens/pencils, and highlighters.

 

TOPICS OF STUDY

SEMESTER I Units

  • Review of Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Settling the West
  • Immigration/Urbanization
  • Gilded Age Industrialization
  • Imperialism
  • Progressivism
  • World War I
  • Roaring Twenties

 

SEMESTER II Units

  • Great Depression & New Deal
  • World War II
  • Post World War II—New World Order
  • Atomic Age and the Fifties
  • Conflicts of the Cold War
  • Social Movements and defining events of the Sixties & Seventies
  • The Eighties—New Conservatism and Fall of Communism

 

COMPETENCIES:

1. Analyze primary documents to give better historical perspective to a particular era.

2.Analyze political cartoons to further interpret a historical era.

3.Through geography and basic mapping skills, illustrate the impact of historical alliances, as well as the cause and effect of historical events.

4.Analyze opposing viewpoints on controversial historical events and defend a position.

 

SOPHOMORE HUMANATIES

Room 163

Mrs. McCabe: jmccabe@londonderry.org 432-6941, ext. 2765

Mrs. Prough: vprough@londonderry.org 432-6941, ext. 2862

Course Description / Information:

This course, which fulfills the sophomore English and United States History Requirements, was created to provide an in depth study of selected topics in United States History and major literary movements. Major units will include the Reconstruction, Immigration, WWI, the 1920’s, the Great Depression, WWII, the Civil Rights Movement, and Politics. This course stresses discussion and analysis as a path to learning. Students will be asked continuously to make connections between literature and history. Through various forms of fiction, non-fiction and primary documents, students will examine major events in U.S. history and continue to develop important writing, reading, and research skills through a variety of essays, projects, and cross-curricular assignments. This course is a double period.

GRADING:  A student’s grade is based on total points earned as a percentage of total possible points. Points are earned through a variety of assessments, including classwork, homework, projects, quizzes and tests. Class participation will also be considered as involvement and discussion are a critical component of this class.

 

Assignments

Class Participation

Quizzes

Tests/Projects

30%

20%

20%

30%

SEMESTER GRADING CRITERIA:  Each quarter grade is worth 40% of the final average, with the semester exam accounting for the remaining 20%. Successful completion of each semester earns ½ credit toward the graduation requirements.

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Attendance is an essential part of the learning process. When students are absent, there are academic consequences. During any given quarter, a student may accrue up to five absences from the class before he/she will earn an administrative failure for that quarter. Three tardies will equal one absence; 20 minutes or more late to class will be considered equal to one absence. Further details and conditions of the LHS attendance policy can be found on pgs. 23-24 of the Student Handbook.

LATE WORK/MAKE-UP WORK POLICY: Homework will include various assignments that range from readings of various texts, to assorted worksheets, organizers, research, and studying for quizzes and tests.  If a student is absent, they will receive one week to turn in missing work and/or make-up exams.  If the student is absent the day a long term assignment is due, the assignment will be due the day the student returns. Extenuating circumstances will be determined on a case by case basis. It is the student’s responsibility to meet with their teacher to work out details.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY: See “Plagiarism, Cheating, Improper Use of Technology” on pg. 40 of the Student Handbook for details. Penalties for plagiarism and/or cheating may include zero or reduced credit, and/or mandatory revision of the work in question. Additional action may be taken by administration pending the circumstances.

CLASS SUPPLIES: The course text is McGraw Hill/Glencoe’s The American Republic Since 1877 © 2005. This text book should be covered at all times to secure its condition. In addition to the course text, required materials include a notebook, a 3-ring binder for all handouts, an assignment book of sorts, pens/pencils, and highlighters.

 

Semester I

Historical Topics

Literature

Competencies

Review of Civil War and Reconstruction

Soul Catcher

Competency 1

Settling the West

Tales of the West

Immigration/Urbanization

Uprising

  Competency 2

Progressivism

Imperialism

Macbeth

 

World War I 

Roaring Twenties

Bernice Bobs her Hair and Inherit the Wind

 

Semester 2

Great Depression

Night and Desert Exile

Competency 3

WWII

Conflicts of the Cold War

Fahrenheit 451

 

Social Movements

To Kill a Mockingbird

 Competency 4

Defining events of the Sixties & Seventies

The Eighties—New Conservatism and Fall of Communism

Readings

 

 

 

 

COMPETENCIES:

  1. Students will be able to analyze literature (plot, ideas, etc.) using historical content.
  2. The student will research a historical topic and present it to the class using persuasive techniques.
  3. The student will analyze an assigned historical document demonstrating analysis of the source, analysis of the intended audience, identification of the main idea, identification of the supporting facts, and evaluation of the conclusion.
  4. The student will research an assigned historical topic and produce a multi-genre project.